Glossary of Terms – Electric Piano Definitions

 

Action

This is the name given to the mechanism that is operated when you press down a key. This determines how the piano “feels”. Electric pianos usually have weighted or hammered action keys as this gives a more realistic feel of an acoustic piano.

AWM

Advanced wave memory. Dynamic stereo sampling of the sounds produces a sound that is like a real acoustic piano. The real sound is recorded from the acoustic piano or instrument and then a high-quality digital filter is applied to this recorded sound. Not only that but the real sounds are recorded at different volume levels to produce an even more realistic range of sounds.

Channel

MIDI uses 16 channels which allows you to control 16 different instruments or voices independently.

Chorus

This is one of the sound effects you get from a keyboard. It produces a full depth sound.

Delay

This is another of the sound effects from your electric piano.

DSP

This stands for Digital Signal Processor. This generates and controls the sound effects.

Linear morphing AiF

A Linear Morphing AIF sound source reproduces wider than ever, more natural fortissimos and pianissimos. A world-famous brand concert grand piano was used to collect samples of tones produced by four optimum key pressures for each note. Next, morphing technology was used to modify the notes for continuity. The result is naturally smooth transitions from delicate pianissimos to powerful fortissimos, which brings you a level of grand piano expression that until now was difficult to reproduce in a digital piano.

RH 3

RH 3 stands for real weighted hammer action 3. This means that each key is weighted independently just like an acoustic piano has heavier keys on the lower end of the register and progressively get lighter as you go towards upper keys.

 

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